Thursday, September 14, 2017

The A & B's (and yes, a C) of Using Sportlots

I've been using Sportlots for a few years now and it's become my number one source for cards. If you've ever bought off of the site, you know that it's a great resource for most cards, particularly base cards. You're probably also aware that you have to do a little bit of searching in order to maximize your savings with shipping costs. For larger purchases, I've started using a spreadsheet (Google Sheets) when shopping.

I begin by doing a search of a particular card and then copy the condition, price, qty and dealer name, and then paste it under the card info. I'll do this for as many cards as I'm interested in. Once finished, I'll flip back and forth between tabs, checking shipping costs and the maximum number of cards under one cost for a given dealer. When I feel I'm ready to begin filling the cart on the sportlots website, I'll highlight all of the info on the spreadsheet and then click Command F (on a Mac). Doing this will allow me to search for all the cards I'm interested in that a particular seller might have. It can be a little time consuming, but I feel like it's the best way for me to get the most out of my collecting dollar.





I did this to purchase a number of cards for my newest projects- The Hawk's Nest (all-time Seahawks roster) and the U.S.S. Mariner (all-time Mariners roster). It amounted to 21 cards for a little over $11, from 6 different sellers. Unfortunately, one of the sellers couldn't find the card I'd ordered from him, making it only 20 received for approximately $8.50.





One of the conditions I set up for this project was no cards of players in other uniforms, but, as I found with Bradford, sometimes that's the only card that lists them as a Seahawk. Or, as the case with the former Bucs running back, every card listing him with Seattle shows him in a Tampa uni. I'll accept this and put him in the binder.




One of my favorite things about things like this is discovering that a player only appeared on one card as a member of your team. This was the case for Kim Allen and Rick Anderson. It makes the decision easy as to which card to include for that player.






In announcing my new projects, I also mentioned how I'd like to have a variety of card products,  represented. So there will be junk like the Score football below (Burleson) or Fleer above (Glenn Abbott) that I'd otherwise not collect. 







Then again, it might also help me in a renewed appreciation for products like Ultra and a number of different Pacific products. For team collectors, Pacific was a godsend, as they would often have some of the more obscure players. I have a feeling I'll be acquiring a lot of Pacific cards for these binders.




So there you go... some guys whose last names begin with 'A', others with 'B', and even a 'C'. And a few simple, albeit time consuming, steps in shopping on a budget.



2 comments:

  1. I've done spreadsheets for Sportlots purchases before. It can get pretty tedious, but otherwise you wind up spending much more than you should.

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  2. I love looking at data and I love baseball cards... I too use a spreadsheet to help maximize my purchase. Sportlots is my favorite little corner of the cardboard world to lose a couple of hours.

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